The Heart of Prajna Paramita Sutra

Friday, 22 April 20168:20 AM(View: 2173)
The Heart of Prajna Paramita Sutra
The Heart of Prajna Paramita Sutra

          Translated by Tang Dharma Master of the Tripitaka Hsüan-Tsang on imperial command.

When Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva was practicing the profound prajna paramita, he illuminated the five skandhas and saw that they are all empty, and he crossed  beyond all suffering and difficulty. 
   

Shariputra, form does not differ from emptiness;  emptiness does not differ from form. Form itself is emptiness; emptiness itself is form. So, too, are feeling, cognition, formation, and consciousness. Shariputra, all dharmas are empty of characteristics.  They are not produced. Not destroyed, not defiled, not  pure, and they neither increase nor diminish.

Therefore, in emptiness there is no form, feeling, cognition,  formation, or consciousness; no eyes, ears, nose, tongue,  body, or mind; no sights, sounds, smells, tastes, objects of  touch, or dharmas; no field of the eyes, up to and  including no field of mind-consciousness; and no  ignorance or ending of ignorance, up to and including no  old age and death or ending of old age and death. There is no suffering, no accumulating, no extinction, no way, and  no understanding and no attaining.   

Because nothing is attained, the Bodhisattva, through  reliance on prajna paramita, is unimpeded in his mind.  Because there is no impediment, he is not afraid, and he leaves distorted dream-thinking far behind. Ultimately Nirvana!

All Buddhas of the three periods of time attain  Anuttarasamyaksambodhi through reliance on prajna  paramita. Therefore, know that prajna paramita is a  great spiritual mantra, a great bright mantra, a supreme  mantra, an unequalled mantra. It can remove all  suffering; it is genuine and not false. That is why the  mantra of prajna paramita was spoken. Recite it like this: 

Gate gate paragate parasamgate bodhi svaha!

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